whitecoatjourney

Anonymous asked:

What system do you think is better regarding getting into medical school? A. 50/50, which is based on the separation of males and females. So let's say 50 spots for males and 50 for females. Males and females compete against each other. In this if a female has a 3.5 GPA, she might not get in, while a male with a 2.7 GPA can easily get accepted. B. All equal. Males and females compete on 100 spots equally. Since adapting the second system, male student numbers have decreased significantly.

ladykaymd answered:

My ONLY opinion on med school admissions is this: 

Take the best applicants. Take the BEST applicants. Take the BEST applicants regardless of gender, race, religion, creed, sexuality, etc. Such things don’t matter when considering who merits a position. Medical schools should simply be considering which students are academically capable of managing the rigorous course load. They should consider which students exemplify the values they would like to see their doctors exhibit. 

whitecoatjourney:

philosonista:

foregoingsanity:

Easy for an upper middle class white person to say.

Now, i don’t know exactly what you mean by “best applicant” but if you mean what would commonly be understood as the high GPA earning student with the good to awesome MCAT score and tons of volunteer hours including that life-changing trip to Africa, then I’m going to go ahead and offer you a few seats for you and your privilege.

It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you’ve had to work your way through high school to help support your family and you paid for college yourself. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you don’t get enough to eat, when your water is sometimes turned off, when you witness daily violence and oppression in your neighborhood. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when the high school you are zoned to is underfunded and teachers leave every single year. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you finally get into college you realize how little they taught you in high school. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you work the graveyard shift and spend time volunteering and doing school work between raising a family and paying bills. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you experience daily racist/classist microaggressions, street harassment, and cop harassment.

Here take a look at these heart warming statistics:

You’ll notice that in 2008 over 70% of physicians are white and over 70% of physicians are male.

image

Is there a reason that physicians are predominantly white males and middle or upper class? YES

Is it because POC and poor people would not be good doctors? NO

Should the hardships that an applicant has had to overcome be taken into consideration and outweigh low grades and MCAT scores? Absolutely.

The thought that academic merit should be rewarded above all else — while still considering that the hardships a person endures as a limiting factor of academic success — is something a previous newspaper editor of mine refused to publish. I don’t see why this is such an outrageous idea and neither does the reblogger.

(At the same time, I also don’t see why the reblogger felt warranted in his or her response. Lady Kay said those best capable of handling the rigorous course load should be chosen. If you have to handle a rigorous course load and the burdens of lower socioeconomic status at the same time, I don’t see why that wouldn’t be a measure of your ability to deal with medical school. In medical school, you’re only a full time student who accepts the fact that you will have a shit ton of loans. In this sense, the playing field is considerably leveled come medical school to where these socioeconomic burdens have far less of an effect on academic performance. Lady Kay never said only high MCAT scores and GPA were indicative of your ability to withstand the rigor of medical school.)

But this is worth thinking about…

It would be hard to argue, as Lady Kay prescribes, that we shouldn’t admit applicants partly on the basis of the degree to which the applicant exemplifies and embodies the values we want to guide medicine. What should these values be? Compassion, kindness, humanism, etc. Yes, of course. What is hard to argue, however, is how ADCOMS could ensure that the chosen applicants embody those values. One can volunteer without giving a shit about people. One can pretend to care about other people for an interview, in front of professors you choose to write an LOR, etc. Boxes showing fake values can be fervently checked. Could admitting less privileged minorities ensure some of these values? Because they have “been in the shoes of” many of their patients, would that make them more compassionate? I’d like to see the data.

Another thought: When we privilege disadvantaged minorities in any application assessment process, I worry that we don’t know the degree to which we should be lenient on grades in proportion to disadvantages. The racial and gender percent quotas that medical schools aim for in their matriculating classes is doubtful to be led by informed data and studies on this question. Also consider the reverse kind of discrimination: Discrimination against those who have had so much privilege that their accomplishments are seen as null. I worry that we might be making the wrong calculations in respect to how much accomplishments should be discounted in accordance to privilege.

I’m someone who grew up with a high household income, but who in truth lived off the earnings of a part time school nurse. I’m also someone who is considered by the government to currently live below the poverty line, though my parent’s household income remains just as high. I am truly, truly curious to know how I will be classified by ADCOM’s in their privileged/disadvantaged schema.

Great response from philosonista. I personally think there is a difference between setting a quota for “blank percentage of demographic A” and picking the people who have demonstrated through their schooling and personal life that they could handle the rigors of med school. If that personal life includes crazy multi thousand dollar medical mission trips around the world- awesome! That must have been a great experience. If that personal life means staying above your academics while working and dealing with a system inherently against you, then that’s at least equal (if not greater than) the aforementioned experience. Everything I have read about medical school admissions says they look at the whole person. Quotas don’t allow you to do that.

Yes I agree with both of you. Excellent points!
And again I’m not sure what ladykay meant when she said “best applicant,” which is why I prefaced with that statement. The idea of “best applicant” could include taking into consideration everything that we’ve discussed (as it should!!).

pseudonymous-md
medicaljourney:

lunedeamour:

medicaljourney:

Med school prep - books every pre-med student should read
(Taken with instagram)
Book list:
Complications: A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science by Dr. Atul Gawande
The Mindful Medical Student by Dr. Jeremy Spiegel
Informed Consent: The U.S. Medical Education System Explained by Dr. Benjamin J. Brown
The Medical School Interview by Dr. Jeremiah Fleenor
Med School Confidential: A Complete Guide to the Medical School Experience by  Dr. Robert H. Miller and Dr. Dan Bissell
The Medical School Admissions Guide: A Harvard MD’s Week-by-Week Admissions Handbook by Dr. Suzanne M. Miller
Becoming a Physician: A Practical and Creative Guide to Planning a Career in Medicine by Dr. Jennifer Danek and Dr. Marita Danek
On Call: A Doctor’s Days and Nights in Residency by Dr. Emily Transue
Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon’s First Years by Dr. Michael J. Collins
Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis by Dr. Lisa Sanders
Doctors: The Biography of Medicine by Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland


I need to remember these.



whoa, can’t believe I made this post nearly 2 years ago. glad to see it’s still going strong

medicaljourney:

lunedeamour:

medicaljourney:

Med school prep - books every pre-med student should read

(Taken with instagram)

Book list:

Complications: A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science by Dr. Atul Gawande

The Mindful Medical Student by Dr. Jeremy Spiegel

Informed Consent: The U.S. Medical Education System Explained by Dr. Benjamin J. Brown

The Medical School Interview by Dr. Jeremiah Fleenor

Med School Confidential: A Complete Guide to the Medical School Experience by Dr. Robert H. Miller and Dr. Dan Bissell

The Medical School Admissions Guide: A Harvard MD’s Week-by-Week Admissions Handbook by Dr. Suzanne M. Miller

Becoming a Physician: A Practical and Creative Guide to Planning a Career in Medicine by Dr. Jennifer Danek and Dr. Marita Danek

On Call: A Doctor’s Days and Nights in Residency by Dr. Emily Transue

Hot Lights, Cold Steel: Life, Death and Sleepless Nights in a Surgeon’s First Years by Dr. Michael J. Collins

Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis by Dr. Lisa Sanders

Doctors: The Biography of Medicine by Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland

I need to remember these.

whoa, can’t believe I made this post nearly 2 years ago. glad to see it’s still going strong
visualizingmath

The brachistochrone
This animation is about one of the most significant problems in the history of mathematics: the brachistochrone challenge.
If a ball is to roll down a ramp which connects two points, what must be the shape of the ramp’s curve be, such that the descent time is a minimum?
Intuition says that it should be a straight line. That would minimize the distance, but the minimum time happens when the ramp curve is the one shown: a cycloid.
Johann Bernoulli posed the problem to the mathematicians of Europe in 1696, and ultimately, several found the solution. However, a new branch of mathematics, calculus of variations, had to be invented to deal with such problems. Today, calculus of variations is vital in quantum mechanics and other fields.

The brachistochrone

This animation is about one of the most significant problems in the history of mathematics: the brachistochrone challenge.

If a ball is to roll down a ramp which connects two points, what must be the shape of the ramp’s curve be, such that the descent time is a minimum?

Intuition says that it should be a straight line. That would minimize the distance, but the minimum time happens when the ramp curve is the one shown: a cycloid.

Johann Bernoulli posed the problem to the mathematicians of Europe in 1696, and ultimately, several found the solution. However, a new branch of mathematics, calculus of variations, had to be invented to deal with such problems. Today, calculus of variations is vital in quantum mechanics and other fields.

femscinerd

scientific-women:

theolduvaigorge:

A test that fails

  • by Casey Miller and Keivan Stassun

Universities in the United States rely too heavily on the graduate record examinations (GRE) — a standardized test introduced in 1949 that is an admissions requirement for most US graduate schools. This practice is poor at selecting the most capable students and severely restricts the flow of women and minorities into the sciences.

We are not the only ones to reach this conclusion. William Sedlacek, professor emeritus of education at the University of Maryland, College Park, who has written extensively on the issue, notes that studies find only a weak correlation between the test and ultimate success in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) fields. De-emphasizing the GRE and augmenting admissions procedures with measures of other attributes — such as drive, diligence and the willingness to take scientific risks — would not only make graduate admissions more predictive of the ability to do well but would also increase diversity in STEM.

Test disparities

The GRE, like most standardized tests, reflects certain demographic characteristics of test-takers — such as family socioeconomic status — that are unrelated to their intellectual capacity or academic preparation. The exam’s ‘quantitative score’ — the portion measuring maths acumen, which is most commonly scrutinized in admissions to STEM PhD programmes — correlates closely with gender and ethnicity (see ‘The great divide’). The effect is powerful. According to data from Educational Testing Service (ETS), based in Princeton, New Jersey, the company that administers the GRE, women score 80 points lower on average in the physical sciences than do men, and African Americans score 200 points below white people. In simple terms, the GRE is a better indicator of sex and skin colour than of ability and ultimate success” (read more).

(Source: Nature 303-304, 2014)

image

(x)

futuredoctorweirdo

futuredoctorweirdo:

…I thought I’d type up a few thoughts on doing well in the pre-clinical years.

The best advice that I got was to figure out what worked for me, and to not compare myself to other people. Do that. Try new things at the beginning of MS1 — for example, studying in groups might be more appealing…

ladykaymd

Anonymous asked:

What system do you think is better regarding getting into medical school? A. 50/50, which is based on the separation of males and females. So let's say 50 spots for males and 50 for females. Males and females compete against each other. In this if a female has a 3.5 GPA, she might not get in, while a male with a 2.7 GPA can easily get accepted. B. All equal. Males and females compete on 100 spots equally. Since adapting the second system, male student numbers have decreased significantly.

ladykaymd answered:

My ONLY opinion on med school admissions is this: 

Take the best applicants. Take the BEST applicants. Take the BEST applicants regardless of gender, race, religion, creed, sexuality, etc. Such things don’t matter when considering who merits a position. Medical schools should simply be considering which students are academically capable of managing the rigorous course load. They should consider which students exemplify the values they would like to see their doctors exhibit. 

Easy for an upper middle class white person to say.

Now, i don’t know exactly what you mean by “best applicant” but if you mean what would commonly be understood as the high GPA earning student with the good to awesome MCAT score and tons of volunteer hours including that life-changing trip to Africa, then I’m going to go ahead and offer you a few seats for you and your privilege.

It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you’ve had to work your way through high school to help support your family and you paid for college yourself. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you don’t get enough to eat, when your water is sometimes turned off, when you witness daily violence and oppression in your neighborhood. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when the high school you are zoned to is underfunded and teachers leave every single year. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you finally get into college you realize how little they taught you in high school. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you work the graveyard shift and spend time volunteering and doing school work between raising a family and paying bills. It’s hard to be the “BEST APPLICANT” when you experience daily racist/classist microaggressions, street harassment, and cop harassment.

Here take a look at these heart warming statistics:

You’ll notice that in 2008 over 70% of physicians are white and over 70% of physicians are male.

Is there a reason that physicians are predominantly white males and middle or upper class? YES

Is it because POC and poor people would not be good doctors? NO

Should the hardships that an applicant has had to overcome be taken into consideration and outweigh low grades and MCAT scores? Absolutely